Every once in a while The Name Inspector likes to step back and look at the big picture. This post illustrates ten name categories that account for all the names in the TechCrunch company/product index. Well, almost all of them. The name 1 800 Free 411 would have required its own category, and that would have made eleven categories instead of the magic ten. So let’s just ignore that name for now.

Though most of the TechCrunch names are “Web 2.0″ names, there’s nothing particularly Web 2.0 about the categories. They all represent linguistic naming strategies that can be used for companies or products of any kind.

Of course, there are different ways to categorize names. You can use phonetic properties like sonority or number of syllables. You can use semantic criteria, such as whether they are metaphorical, metonymic, or literally descriptive. The categories below are based on the morphological structure of names: what kinds of meaningful pieces they have and how the pieces fit together. They’re listed in descending order of frequency. The number of names in each category is in parentheses.

1. Real Words (34)

Names that are simply repurposed words. Such names can’t be generically descriptive, because then they wouldn’t be protectible trademarks, so they usually work through metaphor or metonymy (indirect association).

Pros: These names are short and come ready-made with rich, often multiple associations.

Cons: Expect to pay money–possibly a lot–to secure the URL. Trademarking can be tricky too.

Adobe
Amazon
Apple
Dapper
Ether
Expo
Flock
Fox
Grouper
Indeed
Inform.com
Live.com
Multiply
Pandora
Pluck
Revver
Riffs
Shadows
Sphere
Wink
Yahoo!
Yelp

Misspelled words

These are simply words that have been misspelled to make them more distinctive. This addresses the URL/trademark issue. (Update 9/23/2011: See Fritinancy’s great cautionary post about how misspelling does not help to defend a trademark.)

del.icio.us (delicious)
Digg (dig)
flickr (flicker)
Google (googol)
Goowy (gooey or GUI)
Snocap (snow cap)
SoonR (sooner)
Topix (topics)
Zooomr (zoomer)

Foreign words

Renkoo (Japanese renku, a type of poetry)
Rojo (Spanish ‘red’)
Vox (Latin ‘voice’)

2. Compounds (31)

Each of these names consists of two words put together, with the first word receiving the main emphasis in pronunciation. (It doesn’t matter if there’s a space between words). In most cases both words are nouns. Names with verbs in the second position are Bubbleshare, Google Talk, and possibly Tailrank (share, talk, and rank can all be nouns, but they’re verbs under the most natural interpretation). Names with non-nouns in the first position are BlueDot, SocialText, JotSpot, Measure Map, and possibly Jumpcut, Rapleaf, and SearchFox. Again, the first words here can all be nouns, but they’re more naturally treated as two adjectives (blue and social) and a bunch of verbs.

Compounds are a simple way to create new words and are very common in English (and other Germanic languages), so it’s not surprising to find them high on the list.

Pros: The practically limitless number of possible combinations makes it easy to create a unique name. Interesting meanings can be created through the combination of words.

Cons: There are no huge drawbacks, which is one reason that compounds are popular, but they are longer than many other kinds of name.

Attention Trust
Bloglines
BlueDot
Bubbleshare
Facebook
FeedBurner
Filmloop
Firefox
Google Talk
JotSpot
Jumpcut
Measure Map
Netvibes
Newsgator
OPML Editor
Pageflakes
Photobucket
Powerset
Rapleaf
Salesforce
SearchFox
SocialText
Songbird
TagJag
Tagworld
Tailrank
TechMeme
Webshots
Wordpress
Video Egg
YouTube

3. Phrases (25)

These are names that follow normal rules for putting words together to make phrases (other than compounds).

Pros: They sound linguistically natural and have clear meanings because they follow regular rules.

Cons: Phrase names can be long, and they can also sound awkward when used as nouns if they are not already noun phrases (e.g. Have you tried iLike?)

37 Signals
Adaptive Path
AllofMP3
AllPeers
Amie Street (could be a compound, but __ Street is such a common pattern)
CollectiveX
iLike
Last.fm
LinkedIn
MyBlogLog
MySpace
PayPerPost
Planet Web 2.0
rawsugar
SecondLife
SimplyHired
SixApart
StumbleUpon
TheVeniceProject (could be a compound, but the the makes it phrase-like).
TopTenSources

Included in this category are names that consist of a company name or prominent brand name followed by a generic noun. In these names, the first word functions as a kind of modifier of the second.

AIM Pages
Google Reader
Google Video
Microsoft Expo
Yahoo Answers

Notice the Google Talk is not here–it’s on the compound list. That’s because Google Talk is pronounced with the emphasis on Google, which means that the whole thing is treated as one word. As far as The Name Inspector knows, all the names immediately above are pronounced with some emphasis on each word, and the main emphasis on the second. Does anyone disagree?

4. Blends (12)

Each of these names has two parts, at least one of which is a recognizable portion of a word rather than a whole word.

Pros: When they work, blends can be short and elegant and have all the advantages of compounds.

Cons: When they don’t work, blends can be awkward and/or have obscure meanings.

Maxthon (max + marathon)
Microsoft (microcomputer + software)
Netscape (net + landscape)
Newroo (new + kangaroo)
PubSub (publish + subscribe)
Rebtel (rebel + telephone)
Rollyo (roll + your own, or roll + your own)
Sharpcast (sharp + broadcast)
Skype (sky + peer-to-peer)
Technorati (technology + literati)
Wikipedia (wiki + encyclopedia)
Zillow (zillions + pillow, with overlap of -ill-)

5. Tweaked words (11)

Some names are just words that have been slightly changed in pronunciation and spelling–usually with a letter replaced or added.

Pros: As long as people recognize the word, you get all its rich meaning while still having a distinctive name.

Cons: People might not recognize the word, and some of these names can be a little cheesy and gimmicky.

Attensa (attention)
CNet (might stand for computer network, but who thinks of it that way?)
ebay
edgeio
eSnips
iPhone
iTunes
Wikia
Zoho (Soho)
Zune (tune)
Zvents (events)

6. Affixed words (10)

These are all novel forms consisting of a real word and a real prefix or suffix. Notice how common the -ster suffix is.

Pros: These names can be distinctive and meaningful while remaining relatively short.

Cons: Sometimes these names sound contrived. The meanings added by affixes are limited in variety and usually abstract (which means not very vivid).

Browster
CoComment
Dogster
Feedster
Findory
Friendster
Napster
Omnidrive
Performancing (performance isn’t a verb, so doesn’t normally take -ing ending)
PostSecret (post can also be a noun or a verb, making this a compound)

7. Made up or obscure origin (8)

These are short names that are either made up or whose origins are so obscure that they might as well be made up.

Pros: Made-up names can be short, cute, and very distinctive (and therefore easy to trademark).

Cons: Made-up names don’t provide much ready-made meaning to work with (all the meaning has to come from sound symbolism). Good ones are hard to think of, and when they’re short the URLs are likely to be taken.

Bebo
Meebo
Odeo
Ookles
Plaxo
Qumana
Simpy
Zimbra (taken from a Talking Heads song based on a nonsense Dada poem)

8. Puns (8)

These names are words or phrases that have been modified slightly to evoke an appropriate second meaning. They’re similar to blends, but they involve a coincidental similarity between part of the main word and the second evoked word.

Pros: Pun names can be fun and memorable.

Cons: Nothing sounds dumber than a bad pun.

Automattic (automatic, mat –> matt, the guy who started the company)
Consumating (consummating, consumm –> consum(e))
Farecast (forecast, fore –> fare)
LicketyShip (lickety split, split –> ship, the verb)
Memeorandum (memorandum, mem –> meme)
Meetro (metro, met –> meet)
Meevee (teevee/TV, tee –> me(e), the pronoun)
Writely (rightly, right –> write)

9. People’s names (real or fictitious) (5)

Some names are either pitched or recognizable as people’s names. If the audience for a name doesn’t see the connection, the name is just like a made-up one.

Pros: These names are short and give personality to a company (or product or service).

Cons: Aside from personality, these names don’t provide meaning to work with. As with made-up names, good, short ones might not be available as URLs.

Bix (e.g. Bix Beiderbecke)
Jajah (F. Jajah Watamba seems to be their fictitious spokesperson)
Kiko (a name in Japanese and other languages)
Ning (a Chinese name)
Riya (the name of a founder’s daughter)

10. Initials and Acronyms (3)

These are names made up of the first letter of each word in a much longer phrase name. Sometimes the letters are pronounced individually, in which case we can just think of them as initials, and sometimes the combination of letters is pronounced as a word, in which case it’s an acronym.

Pros: These names provide short mnemonics for long, descriptive phrases.

Cons: Zzzzzz. Also, sometimes initials are short when written but long when spoken. For example, the initials www have nine syllables when spoken, while the phrase world wide web has three.

AOL (America Online)
FIM (Fox Interactive Media)
Guba (Gigantic Usenet Binaries Archive)

The Name Inspector hopes that these name categories will be useful to people struggling with their own naming problems. They might suggest naming strategies or spur name ideas that wouldn’t otherwise come up. Good luck in your naming endeavors!

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239 Responses to “10 company name types on TechCrunch: Pros and cons”

  1. on 23 Feb 2007 at 6:46 pm Jajah

    Christopher,

    I enjoyed reading your post before taking off for the weekend. And of course it becomes harder and harder to find a brand/company name nowadays which is short/concise and still available as a couple of top level domains. We are happy with the result honoring Jajah Watamba.

    Thanks for having us in mind and talk Jajah :-)

    Have a great weekend and best regards,

    Frederik

  2. on 23 Feb 2007 at 10:40 pm Greg

    Don’t you think Netscape is really a blend of net + seascape (not landscape), given all of the other nautical themes of Netscape?

  3. on 26 Feb 2007 at 4:16 pm Mark Bean

    What about latin sounding names? e.g. Incantis and another would be numbers e.g. Office20.com

    Any insight on those types of company name?

  4. on 26 Feb 2007 at 6:31 pm CyberMage

    I wasn’t aware that Microsoft was a smoosh of “Micro” and “Ware”.

    Makes you think, doesn’t it?

  5. on 26 Feb 2007 at 7:33 pm The Name Inspector

    Greg: Yeah, I guess that makes more sense. I forgot about that whole nautical thing Netscape had going.

    CyberMage: Oops, put the bold in the wrong place–thanks for that (I changed it).

    Mark: Classical-sounding names are indeed a whole category unto themselves. They were really a trend in the early 1990s, with Pentium and Acura and all the rest. I didn’t make that a category here, because it’s less a structural property than a matter of how recognizably Latin or Greek the origins of the parts are. Attensa is a good example of a Latinate name, but I categorized it with the other tweaked words.

    As for number names, they probably deserve a post of their own. I had a few things to say about them in my analysis of the name 37signals.

  6. on 26 Feb 2007 at 9:08 pm Rajan

    There is one category that you might want to look at which is neologism, being from India I love neologism which are based in Sanskrit.

    Did you know that Viagra was a sankrit derived from the word ‘vyāghrßh’.
    http://www.langmaker.com/db/Phono-semantic_matching

    My startup ‘Motvik’(www.motvik.com) is another sanskrit neologism which is simillar to the sanskrit word ‘satvik’. ‘Satvik’ mean the one who has ‘satva’(pious) ‘guna’(property). On that line we came up with Motvik as one with ‘mobile’ ‘guna’.

    Rajan

  7. on 26 Feb 2007 at 10:47 pm Bad Language / A rose by any other name

    [...] This blog has an interesting post about how other companies chose their name and Salon published a great article about the process of naming. [Added a year later, I also like The Name Inspector’s blog] [...]

  8. on 26 Feb 2007 at 10:48 pm ia

    somebody contests the origin of zillow here:

    http://qwerky.stellify.net/sites/zillow#comment-4939

    i’m tracking the weirder names of web 2.0 there. :) i don’t have ten, like your post.

  9. on 26 Feb 2007 at 10:49 pm Matthew Stibbe (Bad Language)

    Great post. I wish I had seen it a year ago. Reader’s might be interested in the process by which I came up with my company name. I don’t offer it as a role model, but I tried to document my thinking process clearly and that might be interesting: http://www.badlanguage.net/?p=72

  10. on 27 Feb 2007 at 12:42 am John Newton

    You might add that few brand names have been successful with more than 3 syllables. When we started Documentum (4 syl), the only brand that we could think of that had 4 was Panasonic.

    I wrote about our experience here: http://newton.typepad.com/content/2006/04/whats_in_a_name.html

  11. on 27 Feb 2007 at 2:08 am S Hassan

    Great post interesting to read,
    I would loveto hear your opinion in translating names for example is it all right to translate a name from English to another language? or just leave it the same?
    I am planning to name my start up “one2one” Trade events and meetings
    also will love to know your opinion Is it a good Name? it will be in the middle east so the official language is Arabic but almost all of the business community use English in names and all business corresponds but you have to have an Arabic name also weather it is a translation of your company name in English or the same name but written in Arabic it is up to you , but it is really difficult some time to translate a name as you well know it might give it a entirely different meaning

  12. on 27 Feb 2007 at 3:00 am Alex

    It is a great guide even for those online earners who do not run web 2.0. start-ups. I have made a few poor choices of domain names in the past – would not like to do it again.

  13. [...] Chris at the NameInspector, has a good post on Web 2.0 names. It covers 10 categories that encompass nearly all Web 2.0 companies. He has some other interesting posts which you may want to check out including one on Guy Kawasaki’s blog, How to Change the World. [...]

  14. on 27 Feb 2007 at 11:53 am hans

    Another benefit of compounds and phrases is the opportunity to create a double entendre. Our name, postreach, uses the word ‘post’ both as a noun (blog post) and as a prefix (post=after).

  15. [...] In the typology of names, Tinfinger counts as a compound rather than a portmanteau (blend), because it consists of two whole words rather than word parts. The sound is natural and easy, and gets a little poetry from the near-rhyme of the first two syllables. In the orthography this is reflected in the repetition of in, and enhanced by the similarity of the letters T and f. [...]

  16. on 27 Feb 2007 at 4:18 pm links for 2007-02-28 | BrandBrains

    [...] 10 company name types on TechCrunch: Pros and cons (tags: naming branddevelopment marketing advertising) Bookmark to:           [...]

  17. on 27 Feb 2007 at 4:43 pm John Koetsier

    Google Talk totally belongs in #3, Phrases. It’s just like Yahoo! Answers, and I’ve never heard anyone refer to it as googletalk.

    Thanks for the analysis – very interesting!

  18. on 27 Feb 2007 at 5:54 pm Startup Your Lists at Deeplinking

    [...] 10 Company Name Types on TechCrunch Compound or blend? (tags: business analysis language) [...]

  19. on 28 Feb 2007 at 2:03 am Brian Laks

    I have to agree with the popularity of compound names. That is the strategy I have used for many of the pages on my site with great results. For example, brownbeaver, smoothcall, and windfarmer, though, those are adj-noun, adj-verb, noun-verb (i see the noun-verb most frequently). I even thought about making a page called nounverber, but alas, it was already taken!

    To a lesser degree I resort to blends like roboprophet and videonomics. Check out my keyphrase page for some others.

    Great article! I thought I was the only crazy person out there…

  20. on 28 Feb 2007 at 7:19 am Massimiliano

    Firefox is not a compound word since it is the name of the Red Panda so it should go in the real words category.

  21. on 28 Feb 2007 at 8:09 am Eric Kline

    There are many 4 syllable brand names: Mitsubishi, Black & Decker, Ben & Jerry’s, Motorola, Osterizer. They all seem to have that iambic rhythm OSTerIzer, BLACK and DECKer, etc. It flows out easy, so it’s not much harder than a two syllable name.

    The Latin, Greek, Sanskrit names seem to me to fit into the “obscure origin” although some have become so generic that they are just bad names. Examples are Polaris, Mercury, Eureka, Oracle, etc.

    I find that names with punctuation or odd capitalization, like Pro/Engineer are frustrating, because there are too many variations on their use. People do not consistently spell them the same. Also they cannot be used many times because the / and . cannot be used in file names on computers. I see Pro/E as Pro-E, ProE, Pro_E, and Pro/E which makes the name hard to find with a search engine.

  22. on 28 Feb 2007 at 8:24 am Mostly Technical

    Thanks for the article. It’s harder and harder to think of a good domain name that isn’t taken. Your ideas will help feed my lateral-thinking engine!

  23. [...] I found this interesting article about domain names on the LearningCentre forum. The article covers ten types of domain name, with a description, pros, cons and examples of each. Here is a summary of the name types: [...]

  24. on 28 Feb 2007 at 8:42 am Rob

    In the Pros and Cons section, you might add an additional test: if a name contains a unique combination of characters, it will be much easier to search for. These days, names like “Apple” and “Adobe” are not so good, since they can’t be easily searched for.

    Years ago, friends of mine went for a “made up” name when starting a business. They chose “Milum”. It sounded vaguely familiar and sort of Latin. Then the internet came along and they found that having a unique name was really helpful.

  25. [...] Guy Kawasaki’s last two posts over at How to Change the World have focused on language and how people use words to express ideas. Yesterday he pointed readers to The Name Inspector, a PhD in linguistics blogger who has great insights into, you guessed it, names–especially those of businesses. Take this insight on the naming of Apple: Apple Computers is a great name. It’s a model solution to a problem faced by all technology companies: how to make something that’s fundamentally abstract and mysterious seem accessible and appealing. [...]

  26. on 28 Feb 2007 at 1:31 pm Fred

    Hi, Chris –

    I very much enjoyed this post. By the way, I believe you mean “Bix Beiderbecke”.

    best,
    Fred

  27. on 28 Feb 2007 at 3:06 pm blog.cguy.org » C’est quoi ton nom?

    [...] company name types on TechCrunch: Pros and cons : The Name Inspector Commentez, ou laissez un trackback à partir de votre propresite. [...]

  28. [...] As the buzz withing the web 2.0 crowd spreads faster day by day,TechCrunch speculates whether spotplex is a better digg. Instead of using explicit votes by site members, spotplex (whose name might be something between a compound and blend, according to this nice classification) uses actual page views on blog posts to rank them. [...]

  29. on 01 Mar 2007 at 8:29 am Sonny

    A hosting company I used to work for used a billing product named Ubersmith. When we asked them about it, they said it was a prefix and a suffix smashed together.

    I used to ask them a lot about it, because it seemed like such a bizarre word that was hard to remember.

    They said that people used to mispronounce it all the time, but once they got the hang of it, it was easy! Their argument was that it was a name they could define, rather than getting lost in the crowd.

  30. [...] The Name Inspector has a great blog all about naming. In this post, he uses the TechCrunch Company/Product Index to help us understand how names can be categorized into 10 types: [...]

  31. on 02 Mar 2007 at 9:29 am Cosmox

    The science and art of naming is facinating.

    I gravitate toward the rhythmic-sounding names, thus MightyFineHouse.

    I have a great deal of admiration for the truly fun names out like Yahoo! and Woot.

    … and I’ve never understood Amazon.

    Thanks for the great article!

  32. on 02 Mar 2007 at 11:51 am Rob Lord

    Thanks for the mention.

    FYI, Songbird isn’t a compound word; It’s a real word:
    http://unabridged.merriam-webster.com/cgi-bin/unabridged?songbird

    Best, Rob

  33. on 03 Mar 2007 at 11:34 am Jonas

    Nice summary! It´s really facinating how deep you can go in the “art of naming”.

  34. [...] Chris Johnson analyserar vilt om fördelar och nackdelar med olika typer av företagsnamn som listats på TechCrunch. Ganska intressant för oss alla. Vad tycker du, låter etools bra? Tyck till! [...]

  35. on 04 Mar 2007 at 2:33 pm Gary

    Hi – I am tempting to build a brand – Scarecrow Consulting. The feedback is that people do remember – but lots like to take the Mickey – is this because they do not have creative bones in their bodies?

    Gary

    http://www.scarecrowconsulting.co.uk

  36. [...] Wie sehen aber nun die Namen im Web 2.0 aus? Guy Kawasaki hat einen interessanten Artikel gefunden, wo jemand fast das komplette Namensregister von Techcrunch durchgeht und die Namensgebung erläutert. Die Namen werden unterteilt in: [...]

  37. on 07 Mar 2007 at 1:45 pm Jason Alba

    This is a great post – I had a ton of fun with my own company name (JibberJobber.com) and there are some interesting things tied to it. People would frequently say “I’ve heard of that” when they were probably mixing it up with Jibber Jabber or something like that.

    Anyway, its been fun, clever, etc. Even though its longer than what I’m used to, it rolls off the tongue and is easy to spell and remember. And its ties into career management with the “job” part…. cool stuff.

    Oh yeah, in fairness, my buddy came up with me. I had boring name ideas. His was a no-brainer.

  38. on 09 Mar 2007 at 1:50 am Ionut

    Hi, I have some problems understanding the trademark principles.
    I doubt these names can be registered as trademark:

    Mybloglog
    Multiply
    Payperpost
    Indeed

    what do you think ?

    Another question, I’ve bought some domain names a little while ago with intention of developing them, now I’m wondering if they have any value on domain names market. Can you guys take a look ?
    http://www.domainnamesauction.org/

    Thanks

  39. [...] Dejando a un lado la categoría “divertido aunque inútil” a la que he dedicado el párrafo anterior, en un reciente e interesante artículo titulado “10 company name types on TechCrunch: Pros and cons” del blog The Name Inspector, podréis comprobar que los nombres de las aplicaciones web 2.0 en pueden clasificarse en 10 grupos: [...]

  40. on 09 Mar 2007 at 1:03 pm Start a StartUp » Name your startup:

    [...] If you manage to go through a few names on Techcrunch, like The Name Inspector you will find a few patterns: [...]

  41. [...] The post on 10 company name types was so well received that The Name Inspector has decided, shamelessly, to make a sequel. This time we’ll look at names for lesser-known search engines, in which The Name Inspector has a special interest. [...]

  42. [...] Chris Johnson from The Name Inspector wrote a really interesting article about the pros and cons of product naming, splitting everything up in the following categories: [...]

  43. on 11 Mar 2007 at 9:00 am Vero Pepperrell

    Just like Ionut, I’m interested in how easily trademarking “Multiply” and “Indeed” would be? They’re such common words!

    I never thought much of business name creation, ours came out of necessity – We chose pepsmedia for our web dev & marketing company since prospective clients spelling Pepperrell Media correctly was unlikely to happen ;)

  44. on 12 Mar 2007 at 1:15 am Shiley

    What about metacafe? how would you define it?

  45. on 16 Mar 2007 at 2:06 pm Skype : The Name Inspector

    [...] What makes Skype unusual? First, while sky peer-to-peer is an extremely descriptive name for a peer-to-peer telephony service that works worldwide, the -pe portion of Skype is almost impossible to associate with peer-to-peer unless you’re told to. So Skype is really more like a tweak of the word sky. When looked at that way, the name is still unusual because the addition of a single consonant to the end of a word (The Name Inspector is talking about the pronunciation here, not the spelling) is a very uncommon naming strategy. No tweaked word names on the TechCrunch index list or the alternative search engine list are derived that way. [...]

  46. [...] One good way to increase youir chances of having great name ideas is to try creating different types of name. You might start with The Name Inspector’s classification of names and try to think of something in each category. This will make you consider possibilities you otherwise might overlook, and will help you learn what kind of name is right for your company, product, or service. [...]

  47. on 03 Apr 2007 at 1:22 pm max

    hi inspector. and thankyou for our interesting post, i enjoyed it.
    one question: what about “quote” names, one example for all: mr wolf (the pulp fiction problem-solver character)?
    ciao from milano/italy!
    max

  48. on 07 May 2007 at 8:35 pm David Smit

    This post is a vary interesting read. I created a service for finding a domain name for web applications: http://grabagooddomain.com/ It uses real people to suggest available domain names.

  49. on 05 Jul 2007 at 12:18 am Frank fernandis

    When thinking of the name for my company, I tried to conjure up what my clients are desperately seeking, Business Sanity. Thanks for pointing me to Chris Johnson’s site.

  50. on 11 Oct 2007 at 1:40 pm infovark » Playing the Name Game

    [...] Naming a company or a product is harder than you might think. It’s tough to find an interesting, unique and concise name that expresses the goals of the project in a memorable way. We consulted the Name Inspector, Vitamin, and Guy Kawasaki’s blog for help. The global nature of the Internet and the importance of keyword search means that most of the obvious — and not so obvious — company names and domain names have already been registered. [...]

  51. [...] One good way to increase your chances of having great name ideas is to try creating different types of name. You might start with The Name Inspector’s classification of names and try to think of something in each category. This will make you consider possibilities you otherwise might overlook, and will help you learn what kind of name is right for your company, product, or service. [...]

  52. on 01 Nov 2007 at 5:43 pm Ron

    I think domain names with “.tv”, “.fm” extension might be used even more. Names such us, “http://www.justin.tv” or “http://www.wtop.fm”

  53. on 04 Nov 2007 at 1:16 pm Mehmet

    hi inspector.
    And thank you for our interesting post, i enjoyed it.
    But you didnt write Sony. Why?
    Mehmet from Afyon/TURKIYE
    See you.
    Bye

  54. on 19 Nov 2007 at 12:38 am Kale

    Great site, learned a lot from just a couple posts that I have read so far.

    You mention the compound type, but one that you don’t see very often is using “and” to join two words (a true compound!). What do you think about using “and” in a company or site name. The only ones you usually hear of is law firms, but it seems like they might fit in more places as well. I am starting a freelance gig on the side and was thinking of using compound name with “and”…but wonder if it is a bad idea since you don’t see it much.

  55. on 20 Dec 2007 at 1:51 pm Domain Name Generator

    There are some tools at DomainNameSoup to find some of those domains such as del.icio.us and flickr.

  56. on 02 Jan 2008 at 5:03 am Lee

    Thanks for the post. This is good inspiration for trying to think of a domain name :-)

  57. on 08 Mar 2008 at 1:22 pm KoOoZ

    i am trying to come up with a suitable name for a software company. i am avoiding techs and softs,
    i havent found anything goodd yet, any ideas

  58. on 22 Mar 2008 at 9:28 pm Carolyn

    I am hosting a product manager training site which will run on its own domain name. The work is directed at pharmaceuticals. I am thinking the website name is Product ManageRX training 2.0 and the abbreviated version is especially important. Seems to violate all the rules listed here. should email be different? e.g. PM911 is a lot easier to remember although the connotation may not be so positive.
    Thanks very much,
    Carolyn

  59. on 24 Apr 2008 at 10:21 am Withoutabox & Unbox : The Name Inspector

    [...] start with the basics. In The Name Inspector’s typology of names, Withoutabox is a phrase name. A prepositional phrase, more specifically. Without is the [...]

  60. on 22 May 2008 at 8:35 am geap

    great info, really easy to know how to name my company now

  61. [...] Name Inspector in Seattle has posted an article entitled 10 company name types on TechCrunch: Pros and Cons, with a thoughtful analysis of categories the names fall into – he divides them into the following [...]

  62. on 21 Jun 2008 at 9:58 am LEON

    There’s also Reevoo and Mixx, as misspelled names, which are relatively new. http://www.leonbaileygreen.com/index.php/site/permalink/misspelled_internet_brands_names/

  63. [...] 10 company name types on TechCrunch: Pros and cons : The Name Inspector Categorising the names of tech companies (tags: naming branding marketing web2.0) [...]

  64. on 18 Jul 2008 at 4:25 pm Vijay

    The best article i read on naming companies!!

  65. on 09 Aug 2008 at 1:32 pm Bill G

    Naming a company is a job, it need knowledge. This article is really interesting, clearly some up the process of minding a company name is a good idea, find the name is another step …

    Thanks for all this article.

  66. on 13 Oct 2008 at 3:01 pm mrepro

    I agree with your first idea that Netscape is net + landscape. “Scape” is a combining form whose origins are with “landscape”.

    The nautical themes, such as the ship’s steering wheel, are as a result of “Navigator,” the name of the browser.

  67. on 18 Nov 2008 at 2:56 am Roger

    For the web 2.0 search website that I recently built, http://www.yimmiy.com, I looked at a name that is short, quick to pronounce, easy to pronounce in many languages, energetic, fun and it turned out to be a palindrome.

    The name is also to be used as a logo, which is the case in many site names.

    Do we have a category for palindromes?

    Kind regards

    Visit http://www.yimmiy.com

  68. [...] of the more interesting is The Name Inspector blog who recently broke down the 10 categories that account for all the name in the TechCrunch [...]

  69. [...] http://www.thenameinspector.com/10-name-types/ [...]

  70. on 04 Apr 2009 at 2:32 pm Phillip Davis

    It’s always difficult to narrow naming strategies down to a set list, but this one is fairly thorough. Another popular technique/method is the use of alliteration (Best Buy, CocaCola, PayPal, LifeLock, etc) I’m not sure that would qualify as another category per se, but it helps create “sticky” names.

    Of the strategies above, the “Compounds” provide the best opportunity to find an exact matching .com domain name, while still providing a name that makes some sense.

    On the flip side, I wrote a piece in Entrepreneur on the 8 Mistakes to Avoid When Naming a Company…
    http://www.entrepreneur.com/startingabusiness/startupbasics/namingyourbusiness/article76958.html

    Hopefully this proves helpful to your readers. Great piece, great analysis, keep up the good work.

  71. [...] [The Name Inspector] 10 company name types on TechCrunch: Pros and cons [...]

  72. [...] Name Types Types of names in more detail, with lots of examples. [...]

  73. [...] Name Types Types of names in more detail, with lots of examples. [...]

  74. [...] Name Types Types of names in more detail, with lots of examples. [...]

  75. [...] Domain Search – בדיקה האם דומיין פנוי בזמן אמת כשמקלידים Name Types - עוד סוגים של שמות דומיינים, עם הרבה מאוד [...]

  76. on 24 May 2009 at 6:46 am beboanswer

    bebo = blog early, blog often

  77. on 28 May 2009 at 5:48 am KARAM

    I NEED A NAME FOR MY FIRM, IT IS AN ARCHITECTURAL AND WEB DESIGN DEVELOPPERS.

  78. on 30 May 2009 at 6:55 am The Name Inspector

    Karam, please send me an email about that so I’ll have your address and be able to respond.

  79. on 09 Jun 2009 at 8:47 am dave henry

    i found a great post over at onthebutton on how to name a company or product. worth a read: http://onthebutton.wordpress.com/2009/06/09/10-ways-name-your-company-product/

  80. [...] Fellow Podunkers, I Need Your Creativity I found a link that might help: 10 company name types on TechCrunch: Pros and cons : The Name Inspector It discusses the pros and cons of the main company name [...]

  81. on 22 Jul 2009 at 11:46 pm Conny Westh

    Great article about naming companies!

    I put my company name in the category of blends as it is made up by parts from the two words Verifying and Mentoring, and the company is “Verimentor AB” (AB is a abreviation in the swedish language for “Aktiebolag”, Aktie=share and bolag=corporation, e.g. Corporation with shares).

    This name came to my mind as the 5th try to get it accepted by the authorities , and I have already started doing business with an old company name “Jibeco 1701 AB” that was made up by the legal firm that sold the ready company off the shelf, that made me start up faster than otherwise.

    It is a fact that many company names around the world use words that is well known to the international community for naming businesses, with the intension to geting into global business some day it is of course a lot easier to use an internationally accepted company name, it whould be rather tricky to use a specific national naming convention when going global.

    Thanx again for a great webpage, with a lot of useful information!

    Regard
    Conny Westh
    Sweden

  82. on 12 Aug 2009 at 7:13 am sampath

    It really very interesting website.I really enjoy reading this.Here i am going to start a company. It is like doing projects for other companies and i want you to suggest me a good name for that can you?

  83. on 14 Aug 2009 at 10:06 am stephen

    Great website. But all the good names are already gone man!

  84. on 14 Aug 2009 at 10:10 am The Name Inspector

    Stephen, it’s not true! You just have to look hard for them.

    Sampath, I do consulting. Contact me by email if you’re interested.

  85. on 08 Sep 2009 at 11:31 pm jamesaag

    hi i wish to start a web design ,development company.i want a name for it.plz suggest!

  86. on 13 Sep 2009 at 3:13 am asghar dousti

    I need a name for a web design cpmpany
    please help me!

  87. [...] 10 Company Name Types on TechCrunch: Pros and Cons [...]

  88. [...] Name Types Types of names in more detail, with lots of examples. [...]

  89. on 04 Oct 2009 at 9:06 pm iLike & Sons

    A new company name required plz.

  90. [...] company that I’m a part of (well, as soon as we sign an LLC with this name). A post on 10 company name types on TechCrunch is useful. Leave a [...]

  91. on 11 Nov 2009 at 7:45 am phoebe

    i want to make a name for my company ,my company who make laptop bag ,laptop skin ,privacy filter ,more…..
    laptop accessirous

  92. [...] Domain Search – בדיקה האם דומיין פנוי בזמן אמת כשמקלידים Name Types – עוד סוגים של שמות דומיינים, עם הרבה מאוד [...]

  93. on 13 Dec 2009 at 10:30 am Rao Rohit Singh

    Interesting to go through the thread of commenters. I was looking for ideas to look for a name for my new company to be launched. I got my time’s worth going through all the comments. thanks.

  94. on 14 Dec 2009 at 5:47 am Sensex

    Can anyone suggest a good name in sanakrit for a tech co??

  95. [...] Coming up with a strong name can either be fun or a complete burden. Regardless of whether it’s made up (Skype), a misspelling (Google), or a simple word (Borders, Apple); it all goes back to marketing strategy. You can read more about brand name types here. [...]

  96. [...] Coming up with a strong name can either be fun or a complete burden. Regardless of whether it’s made up (Skype), a misspelling (Google), or a simple word (Borders, Apple); it all goes back to marketing strategy. You can read more about brand name types here. [...]

  97. [...] Coming up with a strong name can either be fun or a complete burden. Regardless of whether it’s made up (Skype), a misspelling (Google), or a simple word (Borders, Apple); it all goes back to marketing strategy. You can read more about brand name types here. [...]

  98. on 15 Jan 2010 at 10:32 am uday

    Hi,

    I want to Start a new IT Firm.

    I want to put as xxxxxx Consultancy Services or Infotech or just the name

    xxxxxxxx–Is my Company name ..Please suggest some very meaningful, or Inspirational names Or which sounds very Pleasant…I may not know you but you are playing a vital role in my future.

    Thank you in Advance

  99. on 15 Jan 2010 at 10:36 am uday

    Hi,

    I want to Start a new IT Firm.

    I want to put as xxxxxx Consultancy Servicesor Infotech or just the name

    xxxxxxxx–Is my Company name ..Please suggest some very meaningful, or Inspirational names Or which sounds very Pleasant…I may not know you but you are playing a vital role in my future.

    If time permits please mail me at udhay143@yahoo.com

    Thank you in Advance

  100. on 18 Jan 2010 at 3:07 am kevin

    hi,
    I am planning to start a Computer Networking Firm. Can you suggest me a meaningful (ie. from the name itself we can understand that which type of works are doing in that firm), simple but an elegant name? Please help me.

    with regards,
    kevin

  101. [...] Coming up with a strong name can either be fun or a complete burden. Regardless of whether it’s made up (Skype), a misspelling (Google), or a simple word (Borders, Apple); it all goes back to marketing strategy. You can read more about brand name types here. [...]

  102. on 24 Jan 2010 at 10:19 am Eric Axelson

    Kevin, with something so generic, most names will likely be taken. You may have to take it down to the local level. What geography region will you be primarily serving?

  103. [...] A strong company (or product) name is easily recognizable and is important to good branding. New startups and small businesses face many challenges in coming up with a company name (among the challenges: it’s very difficult to find a good name and an available domain; many short names have already been taken). However, plenty of successful brands have proven that there are many different ways to create a company name. For example, many successful brands use real words (Adobe, Amazon, Apple, Yelp), some use misspelled words (Google), compounds (Facebook, Firefox, WordPress), phrases (LinkedIn, SecondLife) and other variations. If you’re interested in more examples – especially if you’re struggling to find a name for your company – I recommend you read this post about company names types. [...]

  104. [...] 10 Company Name Types, The Name Inspector [...]

  105. on 05 Mar 2010 at 10:19 am chowdary

    i am looking one good meaning small name to my software company any buddy help me in this matter pls, good meaning will be there,good looking also will be there in that name ,
    waiting result as soon as possible
    thank you

  106. [...] Christmas, signifying the expected release of Project Natal. Seeing as online jargon of internet company names today does not really mean anything (since most of the .com domain names in the world are taken up) or until they become verbs, Natal [...]

  107. [...] Domain Search – בדיקה האם דומיין פנוי בזמן אמת כשמקלידים Name Types – עוד סוגים של שמות דומיינים, עם הרבה מאוד [...]

  108. [...] 10 Company Name Types, The Name Inspector [...]

  109. [...] a great related article I found on how brand names are categorized. http://www.thenameinspector.com/10-name-types/ Want the latest posts from the Blogging Barista delivered to your e-mail inbox? Enter your e-mail [...]

  110. on 15 Mar 2010 at 2:09 pm izle

    A strong company (or product) name is easily recognizable and is important to good branding. New startups and small businesses face many challenges in coming up with a company name (among the challenges: it’s very difficult to find a good name and an available domain; many short names have already been taken).

  111. [...] choose personal name-based domains and usernames like http://www.bobjenkins.com. While “Web 2.0″ names tend to utilize literally descriptive words (or misspellings) to symbolize and make their service memorable and keyword-rich, individuals are [...]

  112. on 16 Mar 2010 at 11:24 am rose

    for an extended discussion of company name types, visit http://onthebutton.wordpress.com/2010/03/15/types-company-product-names/#comments

  113. on 17 Mar 2010 at 3:25 am Bob Stolk

    A good article that shows you the different types of company names there are within the branding industry. Some good examples are mentioned. Helpful when in need of a catchy name.

  114. [...] Coming up with a strong name can either be fun or a complete burden. Regardless of whether it’s made up (Skype), a misspelling (Google), or a simple word (Borders, Apple); it all goes back to marketing strategy. You can read more about brand name types here. [...]

  115. on 29 Mar 2010 at 4:26 pm Win $500 – name our new website

    [...] Think web 2.0 – Needs some help ? Check out this great post about web 2.0 names. [...]

  116. on 06 Apr 2010 at 4:11 am Lamarquise

    Excellent !

  117. [...] a couple of words and stick them together like Facebook, Firefox, YouTube, etc.  This post – 10 company name types on TechCrunch from TheNameInspector is a great read if you are looking for ideas.  There are pluses and minuses [...]

  118. on 05 May 2010 at 11:04 am Are you a domain maniac?

    [...] 10 Name Types is a wonderful article talking about the different types you can think of, when brainstorming about a domain name such as (Real words, compounds, phrases, blends, tweaked words etc.) [...]

  119. on 05 May 2010 at 11:04 am Are you a domain maniac?

    [...] 10 Name Types is a wonderful article talking about the different types you can think of, when brainstorming about a domain name such as (Real words, compounds, phrases, blends, tweaked words etc.) [...]

  120. [...] Internet start-ups have broken many traditional naming conventions with site names coming from made up words (Hulu, Twitter) affixed words (Napster, Friendster) and tweaked words (ebay,iTunes) More here. [...]

  121. on 10 Jun 2010 at 1:08 pm Yallin

    It took us 3 weeks to find a name that me and my partner liked (sort-of) for our business review site (still in developement). It is getting harder and harder to find good names and URLS to match them.

  122. on 11 Jun 2010 at 8:44 pm dhiraj kumar

    hi,
    This is dhiraj and i want to know that how creat my company name, so please you suggest me a good name, which can i allounce my company name.

  123. on 18 Jun 2010 at 11:51 pm eranda

    What about howstuffworks.com like names ????????????

  124. on 19 Jun 2010 at 7:43 pm Pankaj singh

    HI,

    How r u
    I need u r help i am runnign a small internet company

    My brand name is “GEONET” .This name is already taken by some person So i have to Change the name on Urgent basis i am facing some problem please help me out.

    Thank’s

  125. [...] Falls du dich bei deiner Namensfindung von den ganz Großen im Internet inspiriren lassen willst, findest du eine spannende Namensanaylse auf der Webseite thenameinspector.com. [...]

  126. on 13 Jul 2010 at 8:42 pm Isobel

    Hi Name Inspector,

    My business partner and I manage the administration of several local businesses. We are looking for an effective business name that expresses our services and values. We offer small office solutions.

    If you have any great ideas, I’d love to hear from you. Regards, Isobel

  127. on 19 Jul 2010 at 12:18 am Are you a domain maniac? | Buzzslot

    [...] 10 Name Types is a wonderful article talking about the different types you can think of, when brainstorming about a domain name such as (Real words, compounds, phrases, blends, tweaked words etc.) [...]

  128. on 23 Jul 2010 at 1:05 pm tzvika

    hi,

    it’s a great post. i couldnt agree more.
    the name is “your face”. it needs to be attractive enough.
    i’ve got some suggestions on my site. i work in PR& media, and domaining.

    tzvika

  129. [...] a touch point for this post, The Name Inspector will look back on his old “10 company name types on TechCrunch” post, the most-visited page on this blog. That post broke down the names in the TechCrunch index at that [...]

  130. on 21 Sep 2010 at 12:33 am logo design

    Jee that was some wonderful information on brands, i particularly was amazed to see the foreign branding concepts. A similar post http://www.logoblog.org/famous-brands-name-stories/ also explains brand stories

  131. on 05 Oct 2010 at 1:49 am Shakti Singh Rathore

    as we are plan to open a engineering Company which caters to design manufacturing of Jigs & Fixture pls suggest me a meaningful name

  132. on 01 Nov 2010 at 3:27 pm Marcus (namer)

    Good with pros and cons for each type! I like the blend ones like for instance Rebtel. It’s just short, catchy, distinct and has attitude.

  133. on 01 Dec 2010 at 11:54 am siva

    hi,
    I am planning to start a Computer institution. Can you suggest me a meaningful word, simple but an innovative name? Please help me.

    with regards,
    siva

  134. on 01 Dec 2010 at 12:06 pm Tips for naming your startup

    [...] Nameinspector:10 name types [...]

  135. on 03 Dec 2010 at 6:37 am rajat

    company name idea

  136. [...] Nameinspector:10 name types [...]

  137. on 11 Dec 2010 at 2:47 am mkp

    i am looking one good meaning small name to my software company any buddy help me in this matter pls, good meaning will be there,good looking also will be there in that name ,Please also comment on “cinosys” which i decide to take.
    waiting result as soon as possible
    thank you

  138. on 15 Dec 2010 at 1:59 am bijoy shah

    hey i am looking one good meaningful name for my new cookware company. we are into manufacturing of pot and pans

  139. on 30 Dec 2010 at 3:31 am Deepak

    Hey, I am looking for a good, Meaningful company name for my garments trading company, basically for exports

  140. on 27 Jan 2011 at 2:50 am GUL HASSAN

    I NEED A FIRM NAME FOR MARTIALARTS EQUIPMENT PLEASE TELL ME WHAT I DO FOR IT.

  141. on 27 Jan 2011 at 2:55 am GUL HASSAN

    HI DEEPAK(EASTERN WEARS OR SCION INT).

  142. on 27 Jan 2011 at 2:56 am GUL HASSAN

    THIS IS MY YAHOO MAIL ADDRESS(GUL_HSSN@YAHOO.COM)

  143. [...] Coming up with a strong name can either be fun or a complete burden. Regardless of whether it’s made up (Skype), a misspelling (Google), or a simple word (Borders, Apple); it all goes back to marketing strategy. You can read more about brand name types here. [...]

  144. [...] computer arts projects #143 page 83 http://www.thenameinspector.com/10-name-types/ No Responses to “10 tips for building your brand [...]

  145. on 14 Mar 2011 at 1:40 am Prom Diva

    The efforts you have taken for categorizing these names into various categories are really appreciable. It helped me to understand the general trends and methods to be followed while finalizing a name for my company. Thanks for sharing.

  146. on 25 Mar 2011 at 8:23 am karthik

    Sir Or Madam,

    I am loking for aromored company name
    pls advise me

  147. [...] Domain Search – בדיקה האם דומיין פנוי בזמן אמת כשמקלידים Name Types – עוד סוגים של שמות דומיינים, עם הרבה מאוד דוגמאות Tags: [...]

  148. [...] Domain Search – בדיקה האם דומיין פנוי בזמן אמת כשמקלידים Name Types – עוד סוגים של שמות דומיינים, עם הרבה מאוד [...]

  149. on 12 Apr 2011 at 11:20 pm Company Name Generator

    Great post. Very useful.
    Thanks a lot.

  150. on 01 May 2011 at 8:42 pm hawa

    hi

    iam looking one good small name to our construction company pls help

  151. [...] chances of having great name ideas is to try creating different types of name. You might start with The Name Inspector’s classification of names and try to think of something in each category. This will make you consider possibilities you [...]

  152. on 22 May 2011 at 2:12 am oladeji mojeed opeyemi

    pls, i want to start a small company. laptop repair,sales and maintenance.and networking probaly with gsm but need a meaningful name do it may not bear my name. send me some meaningful name cos i want to register with government.oladeji_opeyemi@yahoo.com
    Thanks.

  153. on 22 May 2011 at 5:45 am aishwarys

    hey….
    i m planning to start a software solution company…~~ n m quite stuck with the name of the company…!!! can some one pl help me out..

  154. on 26 May 2011 at 1:57 pm Teddy

    Good post. Found this 4 years after it was written and a lot of the points you make above still make sense. Thanks for sharing.

  155. on 29 May 2011 at 5:19 am sachin patil

    as we are plan to open a engineering Company which caters to design , manufacturing of electrical control panel ! pls suggest me a meaningful name .

  156. [...] the meantime, We were reading the article http://www.thenameinspector.com/10-name-types/ and Option 2 Compounds attracted us as more and more companies in web 2.0 era and we decided to go [...]

  157. on 02 Jul 2011 at 11:26 pm vijay

    hi,
    i am looking for some good name for my company which i am planning to start . the company will be in software development and system integration.

    kindly suggest me few good names

  158. [...] Coming up with a strong name can either be fun or a complete burden. Regardless of whether it’s made up (Skype), a misspelling (Google), or a simple word (Borders, Apple); it all goes back to marketing strategy. You can read more about brand name types here. [...]

  159. [...] this excellent article about the different types of company [...]

  160. on 06 Sep 2011 at 4:23 am nvn

    Help Me Think Of a Clever Name for a Computer Repair/Maintenance/Mobile Service

  161. on 08 Sep 2011 at 12:08 am Zaryaab

    I need one best a small name for my construction company,can you help me?

  162. on 08 Sep 2011 at 12:10 am A.Zaryaab

    I need one business name and small and best and lucky name for my construction company please help me on this regards,

  163. on 22 Sep 2011 at 12:54 am -

    [...] van namen die passen in de genoemde categorieën zijn o.a. te vinden in het genoemde artikel van The Name Inspector. Meer op die site via deze pagina. Ik zal zelf in mijn boek Be Good & Show It dieper ingaan op [...]

  164. [...] There is an excellent article about 10 company name types on TechCrunch [...]

  165. [...] There is an excellent article about 10 company name types on TechCrunch [...]

  166. [...] There is an excellent article about 10 company name types on TechCrunch [...]

  167. on 15 Oct 2011 at 3:20 am Lavz

    I am for good name suggestion on a recruitment blog. Any Suggestions?

  168. on 15 Oct 2011 at 10:26 pm Glumbo

    Great list. I went with a made up word for my company name

  169. on 23 Oct 2011 at 7:26 pm Classifieds

    Looking for a name for a Indian Web hosting company, can you suggest something.I have many tried many options, but couldn’t come up with a decent one. Lets see I will try to work out a name with your 10 suggestions too.

  170. [...] Name Generator – Total GuideUse a Business Management Degree to Run Your Own Business10 company name types on TechCrunch: Pros and cons : The Name Inspector div.socialicons{float:left;display:block;margin-right: 10px;}div.socialicons p{margin-bottom: [...]

  171. on 11 Nov 2011 at 10:35 am Leveling guide Cataclysm

    I am choosing a name for my company and this post is something I really wanted to find. Thank you very much for a detailed analysis!

  172. on 12 Nov 2011 at 10:42 pm Craig

    i need a name for my company… we produce disinfectants,dettol and germicides, liquid soap as well

  173. on 16 Nov 2011 at 7:51 pm norina

    Hi.

    I need a name for my management, investment and insurance consulting services… I hope you can help in this problem… If possible, i would like the name starts with Na…. thanks a lot….

  174. on 25 Nov 2011 at 3:01 am Create Your Own Electricity

    Interesting post! Nowadays it’s getting more complicated to choose a business name. Apart from domain availability, we have to check if Facebook/Twitter/other social madia names are available too. Hence we are seeing a lot of weird made-up names.

  175. on 26 Nov 2011 at 10:00 pm asha

    i want a religious name for the company, plz suggest earlier, company will make kundly & provide a solution for the people….

  176. on 30 Nov 2011 at 12:52 am Habib

    hello

    i have a printing press, please suggest the earlier company name

  177. on 15 Dec 2011 at 3:47 pm Yuriy

    I need a name for my company. It is a social marketing platform.

  178. [...] naming a product or company, it can help to use something that people are already familiar with. This [...]

  179. on 26 Dec 2011 at 11:30 am Dan

    We are changing our name from Altec roofing to ?
    We make our own metal roofing, got any ideas ?

    Thanks,
    Dan

  180. on 30 Dec 2011 at 7:01 am bharath

    need a name for my organisation that sells the electronic goods to the youth at cheaper prices.

  181. on 30 Dec 2011 at 6:48 pm James-Launching Startups

    If you’re looking for a great dot com domain name, http://LaunchKite.com is a directory of some awesome pre-branded domain names, complete with logos. If you’re stuck on a name and are looking for something cool, its a good site to check out!

  182. on 10 Jan 2012 at 10:27 am Melinda

    Do you website and domain name have to be the same? Can you tweak a long business name to create a good website name?
    How?

  183. on 16 Jan 2012 at 3:43 am Are you a domain maniac? | Buzzslot

    [...] 10 Name Types is a wonderful article talking about the different types you can think of, when brainstorming about a domain name such as (Real words, compounds, phrases, blends, tweaked words etc.) This post is by Chris G. Chiotis, designer and blogger about making money online and internet advices. Follow Chris on twitter or Join Chris’ Facebook Page. [...]

  184. on 20 Jan 2012 at 8:27 am swastika sahu

    suggest some technical names for naming a company..

  185. [...] Nameinspector:10 name types [...]

  186. on 08 Feb 2012 at 6:06 pm Ansley Qaurter

    I have started my entrepernuer work by trying to put a ring or jingle to my title. I have told my fellow collegues about this blog and …well granted they outa be grateful!!!

  187. on 15 Feb 2012 at 8:12 pm D-DIVAS

    plz let me know to register the brand name D-DIVAS a diamond jewellery company

  188. [...] article examines the “10 company name types on TechCrunch: Pros and cons” with  offers [...]

  189. [...] Name Types Types of names in more detail, with lots of examples. [...]

  190. [...] helpful do’s and don’ts of naming in addition to the ones above. Also, be sure to check out The Name Inspector. This site goes over 10 different types of names—such as real words, made up words, and word [...]

  191. on 27 Feb 2012 at 1:06 am elliot

    Thanks for the great article, i don’t think enough time/effort is given to company names. Lots of common mistakes.

    I did just find this super useful tool though.

    http://www.namechk.com

    Interestingly this is a good name.
    - short
    - easy to type
    - unique
    - seo friendly (username)
    many pros

    Cheers again

  192. on 28 Feb 2012 at 5:11 am Jane Madu

    Pls
    Am newly married and need a business name for my husband and I . Pls send send me an email, some I Can forward our full name and other info.
    Thanks in anticipation

  193. on 28 Feb 2012 at 10:37 pm sandeep ubhe

    please send me a letest name from word “s” for advertising co.. my email id is sandeepubhe99@yahoo.com.

  194. on 04 Mar 2012 at 2:15 pm gayrettepe-satilik-daire

    I need to find a brand name for a real estate agency. Any help will be appreciated.

    Türkan Emlak

  195. on 04 Mar 2012 at 4:40 pm D

    i had started a consultancy business..And looking for a unique name.
    Can u plz suggest some good biz names…
    If possible starting with the letter “A………..”

    Thanks alotttt…

  196. on 11 Apr 2012 at 3:54 pm Scott

    Good listing. I find blends will usually end up being very ‘artificial’ – as though the owner tried too hard to come up with a blend, but it never really works. Sometimes they work perfectly and roll of the tongue, mostly they seem to be awkward.

  197. on 11 Apr 2012 at 5:09 pm deepu

    i need different types of companies name list for my new designs and laser works

  198. on 21 Apr 2012 at 2:15 am It Company

    hi,
    i am looking for some good name for my company which i am planning to start soon . the company will be in Hardware, software development and system integration.

    Please give me some new IT company name ASAP.

    Best Regards

    Mohammed Rezaul Karim

  199. on 24 Apr 2012 at 4:56 pm Kim - Company Naming

    Great article! Especially true warning about puns. They can be memorable, but there is a very fine line when they can become too cute and ineffective. Thanks for a great tips.

  200. [...] a look at this article via TechCrunch — a great name, by the way — about the pros and cons of different types [...]

  201. [...] give names, but here’s a good guide to enlighten you if you want to find a name for your business http://www.thenameinspector.com/10-name-types/I actually went in a different direction. I wanted a short name, easy to remember, easy to play [...]

  202. [...] how do other tech brand names fare? The Name Inspector blog has compiled and organized a list of companies by their linguistic tendencies. Site creator [...]

  203. [...] how do other tech brand names fare? The Name Inspector blog has compiled and organized a list of companies by their linguistic tendencies. Site creator [...]

  204. [...] how do other tech brand names fare? The Name Inspector blog has compiled and organized a list of companies by their linguistic tendencies. Site creator [...]

  205. [...] how do other tech brand names fare? The Name Inspector blog has compiled and organized a list of companies by their linguistic tendencies. Site creator [...]

  206. [...] how do other tech brand names fare? The Name Inspector blog has compiled and organized a list of companies by their linguistic tendencies. Site creator [...]

  207. [...] how do other tech brand names fare? The Name Inspector blog has compiled and organized a list of companies by their linguistic tendencies. Site creator [...]

  208. [...] how do other tech brand names fare? The Name Inspector blog has compiled and organized a list of companies by their linguistic tendencies. Site creator [...]

  209. [...] how do other tech brand names fare? The Name Inspector blog has compiled and organized a list of companies by their linguistic tendencies. Site creator [...]

  210. on 22 May 2012 at 6:26 am Uwesu

    hii…!!

    can you help me to give a great and unique name, i want to open my company which deal with fiba network support and computer hardware and software.
    please help i need it soon as a possible.
    sorry for your time.

  211. on 28 May 2012 at 5:31 am vasavan

    Hai
    my brother plan to start a small software & project development center
    Kindly suggest some good names for him that cause to start center earlier

    Regards
    vasavan s

  212. on 29 May 2012 at 1:47 pm Monique

    that’s really helpfull
    now i have a good name for my website

  213. on 07 Jun 2012 at 1:14 am consultancy company

    i want a unik name for a consultancy company

  214. on 09 Jun 2012 at 6:54 am Michael

    i want a unique, compounded name for an events company

    A.S.A.P

  215. [...] 10 Company Name Types and its pro and cons (The Name Inspector Blog): [Pun] names are words or phrases that have been modified slightly to evoke an appropriate second meaning. They’re similar to blends, but they involve a coincidental similarity between part of the main word and the second evoked word. Pros: Pun names can be fun and memorable. Cons: Nothing sounds dumber than a bad pun. [...]

  216. on 26 Jun 2012 at 2:38 am syed rahil

    hi im into granite business and im going to start a my own business of pls suggest me a good name for my company.

  217. on 27 Jun 2012 at 6:49 am Daniel

    I use thisnaming tool for products, services and companies which gives name examples, verifies name in lots of languages, checks free domains etc. Awsome!

  218. on 08 Jul 2012 at 11:24 pm kraftan

    i need some help,i need a unique name for my company,its a computer business centre and printing.please your help will greatly help me.

  219. on 10 Jul 2012 at 3:32 pm Brad

    You are so right, a misspelled name is no protection from a trademark infringement case. The USPTO and other organizations that monitor trademarks would consider this “confusingly similar” and you would have to give the name up and there might be punitive damages lobbied against you.

    Just because you can secure the misspelled domain name does not mean you can use it.

    Thanks for the post.

  220. on 10 Jul 2012 at 3:35 pm Matt

    I’m really a fan of Blends or Tweeked company names. I think there are still plenty of domain names out there that people don’t know their value until someone else puts the word together and it fits.

    Just don’t tell the person who you’re buying it from, how valuable it is to you.

    Thanks for the great article.

  221. on 10 Jul 2012 at 8:42 pm kyle

    I run http://www.namella.com, and we are a consultancy for the naming and branding of businesses. Although web 2.0 names have the catchy/creative side of the coin figured out, they leave out ALL the seo juice that Google is willing to give. So unless the owner is able to create natural interest in the website, its best to use a proper mix of brandable and SEO optimized domains.

  222. on 10 Jul 2012 at 8:43 pm Jim

    Don’t completely count out Initials and Acronyms please remember how SCUBA was. There can be a great opportunity for companies to use acronyms if they are at least creative about the letters/words they plan on including.

    Thanks for the well thought out post and all the info!

  223. [...] how do other tech brand names fare? The Name Inspector blog has compiled and organized a list of companies by their linguistic tendencies. Site creator [...]

  224. on 12 Jul 2012 at 4:37 am Devbpo

    Nice post our our company name is devbpo.com
    Lol
    our chairman name start form dev that y we booked

    Dev + Bpo =Devbpo.com

    Isn’t is nice

  225. [...] name for technology blog. check instantdomainsearch.com you should read this to get an idea – 10 company name types on TechCrunch: Pros and cons : The Name Inspector __________________ [Gearbox] ——————————————- Records are made to be [...]

  226. on 28 Jul 2012 at 2:00 am Harpreet

    hi,i am harpreet,i am decide to launch new company related business promotion Like B@B portal or web designing and S.E.O,i am looking my name of my company,kindly suggest me?

  227. on 28 Jul 2012 at 1:09 pm prakash chand

    i want a good name for my new showroom
    electricals & hardwere bussiness
    if the name starts in letter p,b,h,m it isgood

  228. on 30 Jul 2012 at 9:47 am Sao Kim Branding

    Many Thanks. Great brand naming post ever! It seem to be all about web business naming.

  229. [...] like Facebook, mispellings such as Flickr (there’s a great rundown on naming categories at the nameinspector). Choosing a domain name to represent your business online  takes time and insight, but it’s [...]

  230. on 09 Aug 2012 at 10:56 pm Chris

    We have a short and simply name, so it’s easier to find, but nowadays there is a huge problem to find such name…

  231. on 30 Aug 2012 at 7:32 am Company Naming

    Short names that are easy-to-spell and pronounce, stick in the mind of consumers. Your classifications are great. Thanks!

  232. on 30 Aug 2012 at 7:34 am Cool Company Names

    It’s also important to note that the more unique a company name is, the easier it will be to register it as a trademark with the USPTO. Thanks for the insights.

  233. on 31 Aug 2012 at 11:20 pm sponge bob sqauarepants

    I need a good business name that wood help me do the job right. Thanks

  234. on 04 Sep 2012 at 2:43 am company id. and internet

    Dear Sir,
    i am Hrishikesh,i am decide to launch new company related web designing and S.E.O,i am looking my name of my company,
    kindly suggest me?
    as soon as possible

    Thanks & Regards,
    Hrishikesh Khedekar

  235. [...] Smashing Magazine, The Name Inspector, [...]

  236. on 09 Oct 2012 at 7:10 am Terri

    Name Media, the company that owns Buy Domains and Afternic, recently came out with a free online tool that can help businesses to identify business domain names and available corresponding social handles. The search results can be shared through social networks and the feedback used to narrow down the choices.

  237. on 16 Oct 2012 at 10:13 pm XXXXXXXXXX

    looking for a name for new software company

  238. on 12 Nov 2012 at 7:09 pm Mukesh Kumar

    plz suggest me comany name and brand name also for mineral water, plz this is urgent for me

    Thanks and Regards,

  239. on 29 Dec 2012 at 10:01 am Gold Coast Logo Design

    This is the only time I’ve been to your site. Thank you for sharing more details.

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